YOU HAVE TO UNDERSTAND, THAT NO ONE PUTS THEIR CHILDREN IN A BOAT UNLESS THE WATER IS SAFER THAN THE LAND

by Hilla Duka

sunset over the ocean

I’m so lucky, it’s ridiculous. Here I am, with my cancer ridden, broken down body, my fear of leaving my amazing boys, and the more or less constant pain. Oh, and there’s the little detail of the fact that I will most likely die way before my time, and I will still say that I am so lucky it’s ridiculous.

When I found out I have cancer my friends, family and coworkers gathered to offer their sympathies. Mynewsdesk, the amazing company I work for, guaranteed me that I would keep most of my income during sick leave, so that I would not have to worry about money in the middle of all of it. My colleagues in Oslo and in London sent flowers, and baskets full of thoughtful cards and loving gifts, even customers reached out with caring letters, and I don't even have a customer focused position. Acquaintances became friends, and my best friend and the father of my children became my husband. The outpour of love and well wishes was, and continues to be, simply amazing. I received so many messages of hope, love, encouragement, and I was only one person. One person with bad luck and a limited future. So you see, I really am so very, very fortunate.

 

Others are running for their lives, fighting unseen and unheard, drowning in waves of indifference, their future washed away, simply for having the bad luck of being born in the wrong place. The images are horrible, they are literally the very worst thing imaginable, yet if they lead to a more humane stance towards refugees, if they can elicit compassion and make people understand that we have a moral obligation to help, then perhaps publishing these images are worth it. Because the very simple truth is - it’s about human lives. Human beings are running for their lives, and if that is too hard to understand, if you can’t understand the truth of the now iconic “You have to understand, that no one puts their children in a boat unless the water is safer than the land”, then there is something fundamentally wrong. People are dying on the Mediterranean because we won’t let them take an airplane. Because their homes are war-torn and we’ve stood idly by. The only decent thing to do now is take care of these people. Let them in now and sort out the details later. There are a number of great organisations helping, the Red Cross, Medecins sans Frontieres, or smaller initiatives, like Blogghjälpen, set up by a group of Swedish bloggers and aiming at raising 50 000 SEK for UNHCR. We can all do something to help them help. 

 

My employer, Mynewsdesk, sent out an email on Friday, with the modest title “An early Christmas present”, letting us know that in answer to the nightmare on the Mediterranean, they’re donating €50 for each of us to the Red Cross, it made me feel so very grateful. Considering how many employees we are, this is a donation of almost €9000 to the Red Cross. Most companies give their employees some form of Christmas presents. In my opinion, a donation is much more valuable and appreciated than some piece of plastic that will lie around unused. Why not deliver your Christmas presents early this year? People are dying, and because of a small child and a horrible picture the world is finally taking notice. Let’s make the most of that momentum, raise as much money as possible, change as many minds as possible, get as many people into safety as possible, now.

 

I may not be around in twenty years, to face the questions from my kids, see their faces as they ask what I did in face of this humanitarian crisis, but if I am, I will not have to tell them I sat idly by. I will tell them that I did what I could, and that I am proud the company I work for did as well.


Title is a quote from a poem by Warsan Shire. Please take a minute to read it, it is incredibly powerful. 


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